Crook Knees (Part 2)

Okay I hope you have gotten over the bad news about hormones and bad knees from the last article
unfortunately I have come to spoil the party once more.

A study out of Iowa has confirmed what we all suspected, wearing high heels a lot of the time will increase your risk of joint degeneration and subsequent osteoarthritis.

Danielle Barkema, a Masters student at ISM (Iowa State University), found that there are increased forces acting on the joints of ankle, knees and hips that potentially will expedite the development of osteoarthritis.

The good news is that “occasional” use is probably okay
like all things it seems to be about moderation.

Research from the journal of Athletic Training has reported that part of the problem with women’s knees is due to the fact they move differently
Who would have guessed!

Apparently (related to the last article) When women land from leaps and jumps they land “knock-kneed” putting the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) at greater risk of breaking
result one year out rehabilitating after reconstruction surgery
not nice!

The answer? Build up the gluts (butt muscle), quads, hamstrings and calf muscle. One of the best exercises to cover all these
the kettle bell swing. With a light kettle bell weight resting on the ground in front of you squat down keeping a straight back to pick up the weight by the handle with both hands then explosively stand swinging the kettle bell up and out in front of you squeezing your gluts as you do so, the weight should swing up to shoulder height or above.

Driving the movement forward with thrust of your hips while you squeeze your buttocks together.

To see a video example go to www.youtube.com/watch?v=thAV35w7oaw

If you don’t want to get a kettle bell then I would suggest double leg squats, single leg squads and squats and leaps.

Double Squat

Double Squat

Double Squat

Single Leg Squat

Single Leg Squat

Single Leg Squat

Squat and Leap

Squat and Leap

Squat and Leap

First! If you have pain see us. Ring 93844237 for and appointment.

About Greg

Greg qualified in July 1982 graduating from the W.A.I.T (now Curtin University) and began his career at Royal Perth Hospital working in various areas of expertise as he gradually rotated through the different disciplines. This was a fantastic experience for a new graduate as he was exposed to so many different experiences.

He left in 1985 to continue Post Graduate studies and completed a Post Graduate Diploma in Manipulate Therapy (now called Musculoskeletal Therapy). He returned to Royal Perth Hospital as the Senior Physiotherapist in the Out Patient department for two years before a foray into private practice working for another practitioner in the city then joining his father’s practice in 1989.

His area of interest is all musculoskeletal pain but especially the spine. He loves neck and back problems!